Home>Global Art Forum>2016>SESSIONS>GLOBAL ART FORUM 10: MARCH

GLOBAL ART FORUM 10: MARCH

WEDNESDAY MARCH 16, 2016
ART DUBAI, FORT ISLAND, MADINAT JUMEIRAH
3:00pm–7:00pm
 
3:00 - 3:15pm 
WELCOME & INTRODUCTION 
THE FUTURE WAS

What did the future look like in the mid-2000s? In the Mid-East? Why did a talks program at a new regional art fair decide to be “global” and a “forum”? Art Dubai’s Director, Antonia Carver, and the Global Art Forum’s Commissioner and Co-Directors introduced the session by traveling ten years in ten minutes. 
 
Commissioner Shumon BasarAntonia Carver (Director, Art Dubai) with Forum Co-Directors Amal Khalaf and Uzma Z. Rizvi
 
3:15 - 4:00pm 
DISCUSSION
THE FUTURE WAS THE PAST 

Museums have always been programmed to protect the past, but do they also guard the future? Germano Celant and Francesco Vezzoli talked to Hans Ulrich Obrist and Shumon Basar about intrepid interpretations of art history, the anti-nostalgia imperative and ways of protesting against forgetting.   
 
Germano Celant (Director, Fondazione Prada), Hans Ulrich Obrist (Co-Director, Exhibitions and Programmes, Serpentine Galleries) Francesco Vezzoli (Artist) and Shumon Basar (Writer and Global Art Forum 10 Commissioner)

 

4:00 - 4:15pm 
POSTCARD FROM THE FUTURE

‘ Postcards from the Future’ were a series of personal speculations that punctuated the Forum’s programme. They were flashbacks to past moments when the future seemed directed specifically a certain way, only to be replaced by other unforeseen outcomes. These short contributions eschewed conclusions. Instead they stimulated the imagination.' This session featured a new film, ‘Postcard from Space’, by Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige.

 

Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige (Artists) 

 

4:15 - 4:45pm 
PRESENTATION
THE FUTURE WAS THE MARKET

A 'contingent claim' is another term for a financial derivative with a payout dependent on the realization of some future contingent event. In turn, the future prices of these contingent claims become new future events on which further contingent claims are written. When ‘The Market’ is defined as this endless material chain, argued Elie Ayache, time drops out of the equation and the future, literally, is no longer ahead.
 
Elie Ayache (CEO and Co-founder of ITO 33)  
 
4:45 - 5:00pm
INTERMISSION
 
5:00 - 5:30pm
CONVERSATION 
THE FUTURE WAS THE FUTURE 

The word ‘future’ appears sometime in the 15th century. At a point in the 20th century, the future was definitely going to be better for us all. Then it got much, much worse, and arguably, today, it’s just the stuff around us, indistinguishable from the present. Hito Steyerl told Shumon Basar about the cultural and political dreams of the future that failed us, and those that might continue to fuel us into whatever happens to happen next.
 
Hito Steyerl (Filmmaker and writer) and Commissioner Shumon Basar 
 
5:30 - 6:00pm 
CONVERSATION
THE FUTURE WAS OVERCAST

Unable to come to terms with the Tehran she found herself in, artist Jinoos Taghizadeh redrew her landscape on paper. She whacked the high-rise in front of her window for a better view of the mountains. She dwarfed the buildings that towered over the statue in the middle of the square. To imagine a future in this instance is to live in the irreality of a now. The Tehran of concrete, pavement, and metal has surpassed the Tehran of the artist by leaps and bounds. Alas, reality is fluid. But also, perhaps, such a relief, reality is fluid. 
 
Sohrab Mahdavi (Writer) and Tirdad Zolghadr (Curator and writer) 
  
6:00 - 6:30pm
CONVERSATION
THE FUTURE WAS COLLECTIVE 

The past we know is simply what someone imagined, the stories that the humans of that time decided to tell. The future is a mass of unwritten stories. Yes there are reasons to feel afraid, there is trauma from a history thick with imperialism, colonialism, capitalism. But rather than letting that silence us, how do we cultivate the capacity to create? How can we use collaborative ideation to carve out space for futures that are collective, resilient, compelling, and beautiful? How do we use science fiction to develop a future we long for?
 
Adrienne Maree Brown (Writer, social justice facilitator, healer, doula and pleasure activist) and Co-Director Amal Khalaf 
 
6:30 - 7:00pm
PERFORMANCE

THE FUTURE WAS TWO SEMI-CIRCLES (AWAY FROM THE FACE) 

How do you sign the concept of the Future? Christine Sun Kim presented work developed in relation to the different shades of the sound and meaning of the future, breaking down rigid definitions by piecing together a tangle of overlapping languages and systems, including American Sign Language (ASL), which is similar to sound in its intrinsic spatiality. Do futures have personalities? Can futures get further away, altered or moved by the space that we give them?  
 
Christine Sun Kim (Sound Artist) 

  
 
THURSDAY MARCH 17, 2016
ART DUBAI, FORT ISLAND, MADINAT JUMEIRAH
3:00pm–7:00pm
 
3:00 - 3:15pm
WELCOME & INTRODUCTION 
THE FUTURE WAS

Commissioner Shumon Basar with Co-Directors Amal Khalaf and Uzma Z. Rizvi
 
3:15 - 3:30pm
POSTCARD FROM THE FUTURE

‘Postcards from the Future’ were a series of personal speculations that punctuated the Forum’s programme. They were flashbacks to past moments when the future seemed directed specifically a certain way, only to be replaced by other unforeseen outcomes. These short contributions eschewed conclusions. Instead they stimulated the imagination.' Al Gergawi imagined the daily life of an Emirati living in 'Abu Dubai' in 2040.

 

Mishaal Al Gergawi (Writer, Director of the Delma Institute and Co-founder of Cinema Akil) 

 

3:30 - 4:00pm
PRESENTATION
THE FUTURE WAS CLOUD

Since the second half of the 20th century, we have lived under the shadow of two clouds: the mushroom cloud of the atomic bomb, and the ‘cloud’ of distributed information networks. João Ribas, curator of the Museu Serralves exhibition Under the Clouds, explored how the central metaphor of cold war paranoia become the utopian metaphor of today. What are the effect of the Cloud on life and work, leisure and love, and on images, bodies, and minds?
 
João Ribas (Senior Curator and Deputy Director, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art) 
 
4:00 - 4:15pm
POSTCARD FROM THE FUTURE

‘Postcards from the Future’ were a series of personal speculations that punctuated the Forum’s programme. They were flashbacks to past moments when the future seemed directed specifically a certain way, only to be replaced by other unforeseen outcomes. These short contributions eschewed conclusions. Instead they stimulated the imagination.' Raford imagined year 2066 with themes including machinic life, programmable geography and post-industrial economics, defining the next 50 years and the world's global geography.

 

Noah Raford (COO, the Dubai Museum of the Future ) 

 

4:15 - 5:00pm
DISCUSSION
THE FUTURE WAS DESERT

Lauren Beukes and Sophia Al Maria talked to Shumon Basar about why the deep past of the desert is also the perennial projection of literary and cinematic futures. A time-travel trip through Oman and Australia, Namibia and South Africa, via Tatooine, Abu Dhabi and Arrakis.   
 
Lauren Beukes (Novelist, comics writer, TV script writer), Sophia Al Maria (Artist and writer) and Commissioner Shumon Basar
 
5:00 - 5:15pm
INTERMISSION
 
5:15 - 6:00pm
DISCUSSION 
THE FUTURE WAS SCI-FI  

Our imaginations and dreams are steeped in our language, geography and history. Each of these categories are most unstable and yet, expansive in our angst-ridden teen years. In this panel discussion with Noura Al Noman and Mohammad Al Hammadi, young adult sci-fi authors who have excelled at giving voice to the next generation, discussed with Uzma Z. Rizvi the ways in which writing for Emiriati youth has shaped their own understandings of global politics and how a new imagining of here might take shape and happen. 
 
Mohammad Al Hammadi (Writer), Noura Al Noman (Writer for Children & Young Adults), Co-Director Amal Khalaf and Co-Director Uzma Z. Rizvi

 
6:00 - 6:15
POSTCARD FROM THE FUTURE

‘Postcards from the Future’ were a series of personal speculations that punctuated the Forum’s programme. They were flashbacks to past moments when the future seemed directed specifically a certain way, only to be replaced by other unforeseen outcomes. These short contributions eschewed conclusions. Instead they stimulated the imagination.' Reggad traveled back to year 1000 to millenarism doctrines, reciting lyrics from Philip Glass: Symphony No. 5 accompanied by a specially-choreographed new dance work.

 

Yasmina Reggad (Independent Curator and Writer) in collaboration with Lana Fahmi (dancer and choreographer) and Alaa Krimed (choreographer)

 

6:15 - 7:00
CONVERSATION
'PERCEPTION'

Society has a tendency to judge upon their own paradigm, creating misconception that divides communities. Misunderstanding escalates and leads to social segregation and ultimately, conflicts. In a new scope of work, eL Seed explored the topic of ‘perception’ by questioning the level of judgment and misconception society can unconsciously have upon a community based on their differences.
 
Glenn D. Lowry (Director, the Museum of Modern Art, MOMA), eL Seed (Artist) 

 
FRIDAY MARCH 18, 2016
ART DUBAI, FORT ISLAND, MADINAT JUMEIRAH
4:00pm–7:00pm
 

The afternoon featured tweets from the future by Sultan Sooud Al Qassemi (UAE Columnist, Founder, Barjeel Art Foundation)

 

4:00 - 4:15pm 
WELCOME & INTRODUCTION 
THE FUTURE WAS

Commissioner Shumon Basar with Co-Directors Amal Khalaf and Uzma Z. Rizvi
 
4:15 - 4:45pm
PRESENTATION 
THE FUTURE WAS DUBAI

In 1972, George Candilis, a collaborator of Le Corbusier, created a masterplan for Dubai, a year after the formation of the UAE. How much did proposals such as ‘Dubai Tower’ and the Deira corniche follow Le Corbusier’s maxim, that ‘the materials of city planning are: sky, space, trees, steel and cement; in that order and that hierarchy’? From the modernist ideals of John Harris to the work of Greek architect Constantinos Apostolou Doxiadis, who also planned the cities of Detroit and Islamabad, Rashid Bin Shabib presented a visual history of the implied, unrealised and jettisoned ambitions of Dubai’s masterplans.
 
Rashid Bin Shabib (Urbanist) 
 

4:45 - 5:15pm
PRESENTATION

THE FUTURE WAS SMART

Audience joined speculative architect Liam Young and an all-seeing smart city operating system as they took a tour in a driverless taxi through a network of software systems, autonomous infrastructures, ghost architectures, anomalies, glitches, and sprites, searching for the wilds beyond the machine. This performance was an audio-visual expedition to a city found somewhere between the present and the predicted, the real and the imagined, stitched together from fragments of real landscapes and designed urban fictions.

 

Liam Young (Architect and Co-Founder, Tomorrows Thoughts Today and Unknown Fields)

 

5:15 - 6:00pm
PRESENTATION
THE FUTURE WAS SPACE

It was 1957 when Sputnik 1 was launched by the Soviet Union and after 3 months in orbit, the satellite fell back to earth. It was, however, quickly followed by Vangaurd 1 in 1958, launched by the US, which continues to be the oldest material in space. There is a history with material traces that remain as space junk in the universe, floating, orbiting, transforming the ways in which we see the milky way. Space is a cultural landscape within which the many relationships between orbital debris, terrestrial launch sites and politics can be traced and understood. What does an archaeology of space even look like? In this talk, @drspacejunk moved us between the stars and thought through the detritus of earthly celestial politics by way of satellite poetics. 
 
Alice Gorman (Senior Lecturer, Department of Archeology, Flinders University)

 

6:00 - 6:30pm

PRESENTATION
THE FUTURE WAS ENCHANTED

Once upon a time there was a belief in the rational and scientific. During that time, magic, ritual, and religion was pushed aside and the world was thought to be secular. Little did we know that in that rational secular space, there was a secret garden where enchantment and wonder continued to grow and flourish. Imagination fueled these spaces and art, poetry, film, and fiction grew out as alternative ways to understand ourselves and the world around us. Those ways also became ways to map alienation and articulate dystopia, making enchantment subversive.
 
Nada Raza (Curator, Tate Modern; ‘The Missing One’ at Dhaka Art Summit 2016)  

 

6:30 - 7:00pm
PERFORMANCE
THE FUTURE WAS DICHROIC 

Is there a way to reconcile pre- and post-oil histories in the Gulf? The “petroleum interval” we are currently living through may or may not end soon, which poses the burning question of how culture will develop in the region once oil relegates itself into distant heritage. In this performance entitled The Color of Polycarbonates, Monira Al Qadiri mythologised oil through its color, form, machinations and character, by linking it to a culture that preceded it, and imagining a culture that succeeds it. 

 
Monira Al Qadiri (Artist)

 

The performance was made possible with talents from Contemporary Dance Dubai

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

ART DUBAI FAIR LLC ©
|Contact Us|Privacy|Legal|